Sunday, March 15, 2020

How to Request Materials

Please contact us if you have any questions about the LIS collection, or if you would like to request that we purchase an item for the LIS Collection. Be sure to include as much information as possible; the title, author, publisher, and ISBN are required minimally.
 
If you would like to request an item listed below, please use your library's established interlibrary loan process (e.g. OCLC or ALA request form). Otherwise, send your full name, the name of your library, complete title information, shipping address, and a phone number to the document delivery department at email or (fax) 503-588-7119.
 
Most library staff are able to use their library’s interlibrary loan service to borrow professional development material. However, if you do not have access to these services or are not currently affiliated with a library, please contact a member of the Library Support and Development staff to discuss alternative options for borrowing the material.  



Tuesday, February 13, 2018

The Practical Handbook of Library Architecture


Schlipf, F., & Moorman, J. A. (2018). The Practical Handbook of Library Architecture: Creating Building Spaces that Work. Chicago, IL: ALA Editions. ISBN: 9780838915530.

Publisher's Description

Distilling hard fought wisdom gleaned from hundreds of successful library construction projects they've supervised or coordinated, the authors present this definitive resource on library architecture. With a special emphasis on avoiding common problems in library design, in a down-to-earth manner they address a range of issues applicable to any undertaking. From planning completely new library buildings to small remodeling projects, they offer specific how-to and how-not-to guidance. Packed with lists and headings to allow for easy scanning, this handbook

  • provides nuts-and-bolts guidance on the entire process of planning, design, and construction, including "snappy rules" summarizing each chapter;
  • covers new construction, remodeling and expanding of existing buildings, and conversion of non-library spaces to libraries;
  • explains how library buildings actually function as objects, and how that applies to library design;
  • reviews typical design problems of existing libraries, and advises libraries on how to avoid creating dysfunctional buildings and spaces;
  • shows how to collaborate productively with planners, architects, and contractors;
  • discusses the technical needs of basic library spaces, including collection storage, user seating, meeting and conference rooms, craft rooms, study areas, service desks, restrooms, and staff workspaces; and
  • includes careful consideration of technical requirements relating to lighting, electrical systems, security systems, elevators, staircases, and other areas.

Library directors, staff, and planning professionals will want this handbook close at hand before, during, and after any library construction project.

More details from the publisher.

Easy Technology Programs for Libraries

Formar, David. Easy Technology Programs for Libraries: 15 Quick and Popular Programs Your Patrons will Love. Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. 
Are you a librarian struggling to stay engaged in a digital age? Facing budget concerns to keep existing programs running? Don’t have the staff or budget for specialized services? Wonder how to move beyond teaching your patrons HOW to use a computer?  This book gives you 15, step-by-step programs, using free online software, that go beyond basic digital literacy, and provides you, the librarian, with all you need for classes that engage the digital natives and computer users in your community. It includes:
  1. 15 quick, easy classes focused on actual outcomes for patrons, without requiring a budget, dedicated facilities, or specialized knowledge.
  2. Classes that your patrons can relate to, geared towards actual needs or interests, and not just to “techy” people.
  3. How to’s and other elements to effectively use simple software and allow patrons to get optimal results from their effort.
  4. Classes or workshops designed to help the average computer user so he or she can teach patrons with ease and authority.
  5. Tips for teachers or librarians on how to engage their audience and not lose them with information overload.
This book is a complete computer class upgrade solution. Based on the Montessori Method, classes are problem or project based. You are given all the tools you need as a presenter to show relatable uses of technology, making sure the patron can see the possibility involved in using the software. There are step-by-step instructions that focus on your patron leaving with practical skills for everyday life using freely-available software such as YouTube, Ebay, Google, and Monster. Best practices are also included so your patron’s project has the greatest chance of being successful.

Using Social Media to Build Library Communities: A LITA Guide

Young, Scott W. H. and Doralyn Rossmann, editors. Using Social Media to Build Library Communities: A LITA Guide. Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. ISBN 978-1-4422-7051-0
Using Social Media to Build Library Communities: A LITA Guide is a community-building action manual for practitioners across the profession. By bringing together an array of perspectives to explore community building through social media, this book serves as the go-to resource for professionals who want to take social media beyond marketing and promotion to build an inclusive and engaged community of library users. 

Using Social Media to Build Library Communities demonstrates that an energetic and committed community exists to help and guide fellow community builders.

Keeping Up with Emerging Technologies: Best Practices for Information Professionals

Hennig, Nicole. Keeping Up with Emerging Technologies: Best Practices for Information Professionals. Libraries Unlimited, 2017. ISBN 978-1-4408-5440-8.

Today's librarians and information specialists know it's imperative that they keep up with new technologies. But not all technologies are equally important, either within the library setting or to library patrons. So how does one decide which ones to pursue and integrate into services? In the uphill battle to stay current with new and emerging technologies, deciding which ones to pursue and integrate into services is a major challenge. A secondary problem is simply finding the time to consider the question. Readers of Keeping Up with Emerging Technologies will learn all of the best practices and skills to keep up with new technologies and to analyze the ability of specific technologies to meet recognized user needs—all in this single source.

You'll learn the best ways to gather information about new technologies and user needs, to evaluate and analyze information, to curate technology information for others, to set up experiments and evaluate the results, and to present your findings to persuade decision-makers. Written by the former head of user experience at MIT's library system, this guidebook serves information professionals, educators, education technology specialists, and anyone with "emerging technology" or "innovation" in their job titles. It will also be useful for library administrators and those who manage these positions as well as for students seeking a technology-oriented or curriculum-design career path in libraries.

[More from the publisher]