Sunday, March 15, 2020

How to Request Materials

Please contact us if you have any questions about the LIS collection, or if you would like to request that we purchase an item for the LIS Collection. Be sure to include as much information as possible; the title, author, publisher, and ISBN are required minimally.
 
If you would like to request an item listed below, please use your library's established interlibrary loan process (e.g. OCLC or ALA request form). Otherwise, send your full name, the name of your library, complete title information, shipping address, and a phone number to the document delivery department at email or (fax) 503-588-7119.
 
Most library staff are able to use their library’s interlibrary loan service to borrow professional development material. However, if you do not have access to these services or are not currently affiliated with a library, please contact a member of the Library Support and Development staff to discuss alternative options for borrowing the material.  



Thursday, April 28, 2016

Librarian's Nitty-Gritty Guide to Content Marketing

The Librarian's Nitty-Gritty Guide to Content Marketing by Laura Solomon. ALA Editions, 2016. 978-0-8389-1432-8.

Publisher's Description

What is content marketing? Simply put, it’s the most effective way to increase your value to customers. When you deliver content that library users find useful and relevant, you give a compelling answer to their question, “What’s in it for me?” Author of the best-selling book The Librarian's Nitty-Gritty Guide to Social Media, Solomon speaks directly to public relations personnel, web librarians, and other staff responsible for the library's online presence. Filled with nuts-and-bolts advice on how to increase the library's value to its users, her guide:
  • defines the essential characteristics of effective content marketing;
  • explores methods of audience assessment;
  • demonstrates how to optimize content for sharing;
  • explains the elements of an editorial calendar for sustainable content, and shows how to create once and re-purpose many times;
  • describes meaningful metrics for the library context;
  • points out 5 common mistakes and how to avoid them;
  • provides a template for creating personas; and
  • includes first-hand accounts from library marketers.
Making content marketing concepts bite-sized and easily digestible, this guide shows libraries how to market effectively by focusing on what library users find useful and relevant.

More Information

See the publisher's website for Table of Contents and author information.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Digital Curation, Second Edition


Oliver, Gillian and Ross Harvey. Digital Curation. Second Edition. Neal-Schuman, 2016. ISBN: 978-0-8389-1385-7

Description
A great resource for librarians, archivists, or records managers, this revamped and expanded edition is filled with up-to-date best practices. Topics covered include: 
  • key requirements for digital curation, from description and representation to planning and collaboration;
  • the value and utility of metadata;
  • considering the needs of producers and consumers when creating an appraisal and selection policy for digital objects;
  • the paradigm shift by institutions towards cloud computing and its impact on costs, storage, and other key aspects of digital curation;
  • the quality and security of data;
  • new and emerging data curation resources, including innovative digital repository software and digital forensics tools;
  • mechanisms for sharing and reusing data, with expanded sections on open access, open data, and open standards initiatives; and
  • processes to ensure that data are preserved and remain usable over time.


Table of Contents

Part I: Digital Curation: Scope and Incentives
1    Introduction
2    The Changing Landscape
3    Conceptual Models
4    Defining Data

Part II: Key Requirements for Digital Curation
5    Curation and Curators
6    Description and Representation Information
7    Preservation Planning and Policy
8    Sharing Knowledge and Collaborating

Part III: The Digital Curation Lifecycle in Action
9    Designing Data
10    Creating Data
11    Deciding What Data to Keep
12    Ingesting Data
13    Preserving Data
14    Storing Data
15    Using and Reusing Data

Visual Literacy for Libraries

Visual Literacy for Libraries: A Practical, Standards-Based Guide by Nicole E. Brown, Kaila Bussert, Denise Hattwig, and Ann Medaille. American Library Association, 2016. 978-0-8389-1381-9.

Publisher's Description
The importance of images and visual media in today’s culture is changing what it means to be literate in the 21st century. Digital technologies have made it possible for almost anyone to create and share visual media. Yet the pervasiveness of images and visual media does not necessarily mean that individuals are able to critically view, use, and produce visual content. The ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education were developed to address these distinct characteristics of images and visual media. Based on those standards, this book provides librarians and instructors with the tools, strategies, and confidence to apply visual literacy in a library context. Readers will not only learn about ways to develop students’ visual literacy, but also how to use visual materials to make their instruction more engaging. Ideal for the busy librarian who needs ideas, activities, and teaching strategies that are ready to implement, this book
  • shows how to challenge students to delve into finding images, using images in the research process, interpreting and analyzing images, creating visual communications, and using visual content ethically;
  • provides ready-to-go learning activities for engaging critically with visual materials;
  • offers tools and techniques for increasing one’s own visual literacy confidence; and
  • gives strategies for integrating, engaging with and advocating for visual literacy in libraries.
With this book’s guidance, academic professionals can help students master visual literacy, a key competency in today’s media-saturated world, while also enlivening instruction with visual materials.

See the publisher's website for Table of Contents and author information.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Shared Collections: Collaborative Stewardship

Shared Collections: Collaborative Stewardship


Libraries and the organizations that provide services to them are devoting more attention to system-wide organization of collections—whether the "system" is a consortium, a region or a country.  As a strategy for saving space and money while expanding access to additional materials and resources, the value of shared collections is indubitable. This collected volume from the Association of Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) spotlights the histories and experiences of several collaborations at academic libraries. Contributors share winning strategies for intentional decision-making in developing and managing shared collections, both print and digital, with expert guidance such as:

·        analysis of six consortia case studies, ranging from giants like CIC and CARL to regional collaborations like the State of Maine and Manhattan research libraries

·        elements to address in a memo of understanding among participating institutions

·        risk assessment methodologies that enable institutions to focus local resources where they will provide the greatest return; and

·        costs to anticipate for budgeting, such as collection analysis, space, validation, transport, staff, and administration.

With practical advice on issues such as governance and business models, demand driven acquisition, rare works, and access, this monograph is a valuable resource for academic library directors, administrators, and collection development leaders.