Sunday, March 15, 2020

How to Request Materials

Please contact us if you have any questions about the LIS collection, or if you would like to request that we purchase an item for the LIS Collection. Be sure to include as much information as possible; the title, author, publisher, and ISBN are required minimally.
 
If you would like to request an item listed below, please use your library's established interlibrary loan process (e.g. OCLC or ALA request form).  Otherwise, send your full name, the name of your library, complete title information, shipping address, and a phone number to the document delivery department at email or (fax) 503-588-7119.


Most library staff are able to use their library’s interlibrary loan service to borrow professional development material. However, if you do not have access to these services or are not currently affiliated with a library, please contact a member of the Library Support and Development staff to discuss alternative options for borrowing the material.  



Thursday, December 11, 2014

Story Smart



Haven, K. (2014). Story Smart: Using the Science of Story to Persuade, Influence, Inspire, and Teach. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. ISBN: 978-1-61069-811-5

Publisher's Description
This one-of-a-kind book explores the neuroscience behind persuasion and influence to reveal the role that storytelling plays in inspiring, enlightening, and educating an audience.

Storytelling has been used for centuries as a means to sway public opinion, influence behavior, and inspire change. Yet according to recent research, 98 percent of stories shared are ineffective, and one-third of all narratives are actually counterproductive to delivering the meaning intended by the teller. Author Kendall Haven contends that you can craft messages that will resonate effectively with your audience by learning and utilizing the science of story.

Based on breakthroughs in the fields of neural and cognitive sciences, this book demonstrates how stories can exert influence and persuade audiences. Through step-by-step guidance, you will learn how to construct communications for impact, meaning, and accuracy. This practical guide is organized into four sequential parts: the neuroscience of words; the set of tools provided to each user; the influence of narratives in changing beliefs, attitudes, values, and behaviors; and the techniques needed for building powerful, influential, and effective (PIE) stories. This book will help you master the tools and critical skills of effective story-based communication.

Features
  • Shows how to use the power of story to get your message across in any medium or venue
  • Explores the convergence of the neural science of story with the art of communication to reveal the power of words
  • Provides tips, techniques, and strategies for structuring your stories for the most impact
  • Reveals the common communication pitfalls to avoid
The State Library also has the related book, Story Proof: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story.

Monday, December 1, 2014

Creativity and Children's Literature (book)

Saccardi, Marianne. (2014). Creativity and Children's Literature: New Ways to Encourage Divergent Thinking. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. 978-1-61069-355-4.

The children in classrooms today will soon become adult members of society: they will need to apply divergent thinking skills to be effective in all aspects of their lives, regardless of their specific occupation. How well your students meet complicated challenges and take advantage of the opportunities before them decades down the road will depend largely upon the kind of thinking they are trained and encouraged to do today. This book provides a game plan for busy librarians and teachers to develop their students' abilities to arrive at new ideas by utilizing children's books at hand.

Following an introduction in which the author defines divergent thinking, discusses its characteristics, and establishes its vital importance, chapters dedicated to types of literature for children such as fantasy, poetry, and non-fiction present specific titles and relevant activities geared to fostering divergent thinking in young minds. Parents will find the recommendations of the kinds of books to read with their children and explanations of how to engage their children in conversations that will help their creative thinking skills extremely beneficial. The book also includes a case study of a fourth-grade class that applied the principles of divergent thinking to imagine innovative designs and come up with new ideas while studying a social studies/science unit on ecology.

(book description)

The Maker Cookbook (book)

Wall, Cindy R. and Pawloski, Lynn M. (2014). The Maker Cookbook: Recipes for Children's and 'Tween Library Programs. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. 978-1-31069-661-6.

The Maker Movement is sweeping the nation because it is creative and educational—and a lot of fun. Nonetheless, some librarians have hesitated to incorporate the movement into their programming because their libraries do not have dedicated makerspaces. If that describes you, then take heart. Written by librarians for librarians, this "cookbook" proves that every library is already a MakerPlace and provides you with recipes to make your library come alive with creativity.

Easy-to-use, step-by-step guidance helps you create engaging K–8 programs in science and technology, arts and crafts, and home skills that are perfect for the library setting. The menu of ideas is broken into four types of programming. "Appetizers" add a taste of the Maker movement to existing library programs. "Entrees" present full programs for a lengthy one-day event or a short series. "Side Dishes" are programs you can use if you have limited staff, budget, space, or any combination of those. "Desserts" are low-tech programs, suitable for young children. Each "recipe" includes extensions, variations, and curriculum tie-ins that give you even more ways to present the program ideas, whether to a different audience or as part of other related activities. Programs that involve creating a "Balloon Zip Line," a "Zen Garden," or a "Maker Marketplace" will delight library users and generate activity and excitement in your library.

(book description)

Crash Course in Children's Services 2nd Ed. (book)

Peck, Penny. (2014). Crash Course in Children's Services, 2nd Edition. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. 978-1-61069-781-1.

A basic explanation of children's services for persons working in small libraries with limited staff. Tips include conducting reference interviews, handling homework centers, building collections, and planning storytimes. Sources of help are provided with age-appropriate themes and activities. Working with parents and teachers can be a major assignment for the children's librarian. Programming information includes how to conduct tours for school groups and summer reading programs. How to partner with others to share ideas for summer programs is suggested. Providing book discussion groups for students is one method to keep them reading. Issues in providing children's services are detailed.

Children need public library services. Even in small rural libraries managed by small staffs, children's services are critical. This handbook gives practical advice on performing essential duties in the Children's Room of the public library. The tone is how to with little theory, but providing the fundamentals of day-to-day services. Tips are given on reference service including the reference interview, a simple overview of child development, and tips for assisting parents and teachers. Hints are given for managing children who are in the library to do homework or to wait until they are collected by a parent or caregiver. A chapter is given on how to help children find recreational reading, how to market the library, and useful Web sites.

 (book description)